Gardening – Tips on Dealing With Slugs and Snails in the Garden

Gardening - Tips on Dealing With Slugs and Snails in the Garden
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There are many ways to deal with slugs and snails in your garden. Some of the most popular methods include baiting beer traps with wormwood, trapping them using chemical slug pellets, and handpicking them. There are other methods available, including using herbs to deter them. This article will outline a few of the most effective methods.

Trap slugs

To get rid of slugs and snails in the yard, use simple materials found in the home and garden to trap the pests. Slugs and snails don’t like alkaline conditions, so wood ashes, slag, or cinders can be used to trap them. Besides wood, these materials also attract slugs and snails. For best results, use these materials to trap the pests before they can lay eggs.

While you can try natural methods like putting up traps, you should avoid them when possible, as they can cause unwanted side effects. If you’re planning to use traps, place them away from prized plants, so they won’t be attracted to them. Slugs will also leave the dead plants at their own convenience. In addition, traps also save your time and efforts.

The most efficient way to control slugs and snails is to find their hideouts and remove them. Slugs and snails live under ground cover plants, strappy leafed plants, and upturned flower pots. They are usually active during the night, but can stay active all year round if temperatures are mild. You can also take action by removing their preferred hiding places during the day.

One of the easiest ways to trap slugs and snails in the yard is to put up wooden traps. Place these traps in your garden or landscape, so that the pests can’t escape. A wooden trap can be made of wood, cardboard, and upturned flower pots. You can also use an upturned flower pot or a large cabbage leaf. Adding salt to the soil can help increase the salinity of the soil, so it can be used as bait for traps.

Plant herbs to deter slugs

There are a few plants that are naturally slug and snail repellents. Mint is one of them. Slugs and snails won’t eat mint plants, which are invasive and difficult to grow. Cut the mint back to prevent it from becoming a slug food source, and then sprinkle the shredded leaves and stems over the soil around your plants. As the seaweed decays, it adds nutrients to the soil. If you want to get even more creative, you can also add mint leaves to your compost pile.

Other plants that slugs don’t like include those with tough, down-like fur. The day lily hemerocallis and the New Zealand flax phormium are both excellent examples. The succulent foliage of these plants is also a slug deterrent, and plants with waxy cuticles may be a barrier to the slugs.

If you’d rather use organic methods to deter slugs, consider planting some plants that repel slugs. Astrantia and fennel repel slugs due to their strong scent. Sage, rosemary, and anise are also known slug deterrents. Plant these plants along the edges of your beds. This will deter the pests from entering the area and damaging your plants.

Bait beer traps

Beer traps are the easiest method to deal with slugs and snails in your garden. You simply need to place the beer trap about an inch above the ground. These beer traps need to be replenished periodically to ensure that slugs and snails are not attracted to the trap. They may only attract slugs to a few square feet of soil at a time.

The first thing you should know about beer traps. Slugs are attracted to the smell of beer and will fall in. To use beer traps, fill a tuna tin with a bit of beer and set it outside. Make sure that the beer container is deep enough in the soil and that the top is covered to reduce evaporation. You can buy these traps at gardening supply stores or you can even make them yourself by burying a small container and laying it down in your garden.

A second way to get rid of slugs and snails in your garden is to use beer traps. Beer is well-known for its attraction properties to slugs and snails. You can buy or make your own beer trap by mixing equal parts of water and flour. Ensure that the beer trap is deep enough to reach the slug’s hole. Slugs will then crawl into the beer trap and drown in it. In addition to beer, you can also use other liquids like cornmeal, sugar, and yeast.

Handpick slugs

Handpicking slugs and snails can be an effective way to control them. The process of handpicking requires persistence and the right tools. A flashlight and tongs are essential. Snails come out to feed after dark, but if you are in the garden late at night or on a wet day, they may come out sooner. A small container filled with water is a handy tool.

Slugs and snails are hermaphrodites, meaning they have both male and female reproductive organs, but do not need to mate. They usually reach maturity at a period of three to six months. When they begin laying their eggs, they are about one-tenth inch wide and usually live in protected areas of the garden. You should handpick these pests if you see them in your garden.

If you cannot handpick them, you can try using wooden boards or rolled-up newspapers. Slugs like to shelter underneath these items. You should also place shallow pans of beer around your plants. Make sure to bury the lip of the pan below the ground. Empty the traps at least twice a week to avoid attracting the pests. You can also use soapy water to kill them.

Another method for controlling snails and slugs in the garden is to put sugar water or beer in shallow dishes around the garden. These baits will draw slugs and snails into a “safe haven” around the garden. Alternatively, you can also place copper deterrents around your plants. If you want to try a more permanent solution, you can place copper deterrents around your plants.

Use slug pellets

To deal with slugs and snails, you can use a variety of barrier materials. These can be used to prevent them from accessing your plants, such as wood ash, coffee grounds, and cat litter. To make your barrier more effective, you can use copper wire or tape, which gives snails a mild electrical shock. Using eggshells as barriers can also work, but they are a little less effective than eggshells.

The main concern with using slug pellets is the fact that they are not eco-friendly and are not a long-term solution. They create a vicious circle by making your garden dependent on them. They also pollute groundwater, which is harmful to humans and other animals. The pellets also have the added problem of causing remorse in both you and the snails.

If you want to deal with slugs and snail, you can encourage a diverse population of birds in your garden. The birds will provide their own food sources, and you can also attract them by constructing a pond or a pile of logs. But if you want to keep slugs out of your garden, there are some natural remedies you can try.

Slug pellets are not cheap. They can build up quite a hefty bill if you use them every day. That said, they do work as short-term medication. They spare your plants for a while, but slugs will come back as soon as the baits are gone. You’ll have to re-treat the area if the rain falls heavily.

Plant barriers

One way to prevent slugs and snails from attacking your plants is to use cloches and collars. Cloches are small domes that go over individual plants. They will not only deter garden pests, but also protect your plants from the cold. A cloche can be purchased or made yourself by cutting the bottom of an old soft drink bottle. Be sure to avoid plastic cloches because they can create extra heat and condensation inside.

Copper banding is another option that works well against snails. Place copper bands around planter boxes and thick stems. This type of barrier is not toxic to humans, and can withstand the acidic slime of snails. Copper-coated wire will discourage snails from climbing, but won’t kill them. Similarly, crushed egg shells and coffee grounds do not work as slug and snail deterrents.

While they prefer cool temperatures, slugs and snails are most active at night. Their preferred hiding spots are in moist and dark areas, like under weeds or in flower pots. Fortunately, most of the damage caused by slugs and snails can be limited to ornamental plants and grasses. Hand-picking is another effective method, but it is best to pay attention to their hiding places. A weekly hand-picking can be enough.

How to control snails & slugs in your garden – 5 EZ organic methods

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